Comparative performance of three commercial quantitative real-time PCR kits with challenging samples


See how state of the art human DNA quantification kits from all major manufacturers stack up against some of the most challenging samples that Sam Houston State University’s body farm and Department of Forensic Science can throw at them.

Dr. Sheree Hughes-Stamm, Amy Sorensen, and Rachel Houston

Dr. Sheree Hughes-Stamm is an Assistant Professor and the Director of Graduate Programs in the Department of Forensic Science at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas. Sheree's research combines her interests in forensic DNA typing and Forensic Anthropology, and include DNA typing methods for skeletal remains, DNA collection and extraction techniques, room temperature DNA preservation, body fluid identification, "touch" evidence and highly decomposed tissues including alternate DNA markers and Massively Parallel Sequencing (MPS) technologies for forensic identification and intelligence purposes. Dr. Hughes-Stamm was also appointed to the Texas Forensic Science Commission in 2014 by the Texas Governor's office and is currently the Vice-Chair. 

Amy Sorensen is a fifth year doctoral student in the Department of Forensic Science at Sam Houston State University, where she collaborates with the Southeast Texas Applied Forensic Science (STAFS) Facility on various DNA research projects. She received a National Institute of Justice Graduate Research Fellowship for developing faster and more efficient collection, preservation, and processing methods for human identification following mass disasters. In addition, she has considerable experience in DNA extraction on automated systems, DNA quantification and amplification, and a thorough understanding of data interpretation and analysis. Her research has resulted in several publications and has been presented at regional and international conferences. 

Rachel Houston is a doctoral student in the Department of Forensic Science at Sam Houston State University, where she is beginning her fifth year of graduate study. She received a National Institute of Justice Graduate Research Fellowship for a collaborative Cannabis DNA project working with a federal agency. She has extensive field experience in collecting and processing human and Cannabis samples including DNA extraction, real-time quantification, multiplex STR optimization and genetic data analysis. Her research has resulted in multiple publications and has been presented at regional and international conferences.