What are the differences between MDA and DOP/PEP methods of Whole Genome Amplification?
FAQ ID -665

DOP (Degenerate Oligonucleotide-primed PCR) and PEP (Primer Extension Preamplification) are PCR-based whole genome amplification (WGA) methods. REPLI-g amplification uses MDA (Multiple Displacement Amplification) which is not a PCR-based method. MDA is scalable with yields adjustable from ug to mg quantities, whereas DOP typically yields 2-3 ug of DNA per reaction. DOP also generates a shorter product which is not suitable for certain downstream applications (e.g. Southern blot and sub-cloning).

DOP and PEP products are different from REPLI-g MDA products for a number of reasons. First, after amplification is complete, PEP products have active thermostable polymerase that will degrade the amplification product over time, because the polymerase cannot be inactivated. Second, PEP reactions consist of PCR amplicons which have the potential to contaminate other reactions as 'runaway amplicons' (e.g., amplicons in the aerosol that may be co-amplified if they accidentally get into other reactions).

REPLI-g product has neither of these issues. The polymerase is heat-inactivated after the REPLI-g reaction is complete, so it cannot digest the amplified product. There are no issues with 'runaway amplicons', because the reaction is performed at constant temperature by a hyper-branching amplification mechanism, amplifying the genome randomly without generating specific amplicons.